01.03.2017

July 20, 2018

Wine and the Vine in Objets d'Art

ANTIQUITY

We can take ‘Antiquity’ to mean the period from the emergence of writing in Mesopotamia towards 3600 BC to the fall of the Western Roman Empire in 476 AD. 

THE STANDARD OF UR (detail)

The King and His Court are banqueting, 'Peace side', upper register - Royal cemetery of City of Ur

Inlaid mosaic scenes made from shell, red limestone and lapis lazuli, set in bitume, ca. 2550-2400 BC. - British Museum, London

During the Bronze Age, 2700 years before the birth of Christ, the King of Ur drinks wine with his Court. The form of the cups show us that it cannot be beer. This decorative piece is one of the earliest representations of wine in art. It is of Sumerian origin, discovered in the former royal cemetery of the city of Ur, situated to the south of Baghdad in what is now Iraq. The ‘liturgical feast’ shown on the uppermost row of the Standard of Ur’s ‘Scene of Peace’ (below) is probably the first representation of wine-tasting. The King is shown celebrating a victory with his brothers in arms. Wine has been synonymous with sharing, brotherhood, conviviality, unity and nationhood for 4500 years. 

COLLARED JAR

Grotta-Pelos Group
Cyclades, Greece, 3.000-2.800 BC. - Terracotta, 14.9 x 14.6 cm
The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

TUTHMOSIS III OFFERS WINE TO A GOD

Ritual statuette

Dynasty XVIII, 1479-1425 BC. - Black bronze, gold inlay, h. 16.2 cm

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

BOTTLE WITH A HIGH NECK AND A VINE TENDRIL DECORATION

Sedeinga (Sudan)

4th-5th century BC. - Terracotta, h. 34.5 cm
Musée du Louvre, Paris

RHYTON TERMINATING IN THE FOREPART OF A GRIFFIN
5th century BC., Altintepe, Turkey
Gilt silver, h. 23 cm
British Museum, London

RHYTON TERMINATING IN THE FOREPART OF A CENTAUR
ca. 160 BC., Greece
Silver, h. 22 cm
Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

RHYTON
75-125, Roman Empire
Glass, h. 21 cm
Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY

LEVY OENOCHOE
Oriental style, Ionnian
Terracotta, ca. 640-630 BC., 39.50 x 30 cm
Musée du Louvre, Paris

ATTIC RED-FIGURE RHYTON

Douris, 480-470 BC.
Clay, h. 14.8 cm
Musée du Louvre, Paris

RED FIGURE ATTIC BELL-KRATER
ca. 500-490 BC., Athens
33 x 33 cm
Musée du Louvre, Paris

DIONYSUS

ca. 340 BC.

Marble probably from the Greek island of Paros, h. 34 cm

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

HEAD FROM THE STATUE OF THE YOUNG BACCHUS
Unknown Roman artist

First half of 1st century AD., h. 26 cm
The Getty Villa, Malibu, California

INFANT BACCHUS (detail)
Gallo-Roman bronze

Reims
Musée Saint-Rémi, Reims, France

THE MIDDLE AGES

The term ‘Middle Ages’ usually denotes the period immediately following Antiquity. This period goes from the fall of the Western Roman Empire in 476 AD to the discovery of America and the taking of Granada by the royal armies of Aragon and Castile, which both took place in 1492. 

GLASS DRINKING HORN
Made in Italy (North), Langobardic?, 575-625

Glass, 21 x 7 cm
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

DRINKING VESSEL (hanap; one of a pair)
Made in possibly Toulouse, France - 1320-1360

Silver, silver gilt, translucent enamel, and opaque enamel, h. 55.2 cm
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

DRINKING BOWL WITH HANDLE
Made in Tirana, Avar art, 8th century
Silver, d. 18.5 cm
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

CHALICE
Brother Bertinus, Made in possibly Meuse Valley, Northern Europe

1222 - Silver and silver gilt, h. 19.1 cm
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

THE ATTAROUTHI TREASURE - CHALICE
Made in Attarouthi, Syria, Byzantine art, 500-650
Silver and gilded silver, h. 24.6 cm
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

PRIEST CHALICE
Santiago de Penalba, Spain, 12th century
Silver and silver gilt
Musée du Louvre, Paris

THE MODERN ERA

The Modern Era follows the Middle Ages. It started with the taking of Granada and the discovery of America in 1492 and continues to the present day.

DIANA AND THE STAG, DRINKING GAME
Joachim Friess, German, Augsburg, ca. 1620
Partially gilded silver, enamel, jewels (case); iron, wood (movement)

37.5 x 24.1 cm - Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

BRAS DE LUMIÈRE

(One of four three-light sconces)
Etienne-Jean Forestier (or his brother Pierre-Auguste), 1788
Gilt bronze, h. 55.2 cm - Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

DIANA AND THE CENTAUR
Clock, automate, and drinking game
Hans Jakobe I. Bachmannr, 1602-1606
Kunsthistoriches Museum, Vienna, Austria

WINE DECANTER
Johannes Szakall, 1779, Hungarian, Kolozsvár
Silver, partly gilded, h. 32.5 cm
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

GOBLET (ROEMER)
Dutch, probably Amsterdam, early 17th century
Glass, engraved with a diamond point, h. 28.6 cm
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

COMMUNION JUG

Hungarian, 1639
Silver, partly gilded, h. 40.5 cm
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York 

BACCHUS AND A NYMPH WITH A CHILD AND GRAPES

Claude Michel Clodion, French, Paris, ca. 1790-1800

Terracotta, h. 47 cm

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

THE INTOXICATION OF WINE

Claude Michel Clodion, ca. 1780-1790

Terracotta, h. 58.4 cm

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

BACCHANTE SUPPORTED BY BACCHUS AND A FAUN

Claude Michel Clodion, 1795

Terracotta, h. 50.8 cm

Norton Simon Foundation, Los Angeles

WINE AND THE ARTS

Antique Frescoes
Graphics
Sculpture
and Architecture
Mosaic
and Stained Glass
Tapestry
Objets d'art
Fine Art
Photography
Posters
and Press
Painting

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